Our teaching philosophy

Truly active learning only occurs when you receive the information you need, at the time you need it, in the amounts you need.

Our teaching philosophy

Online, made easier

Here at The Creative Guide, we're dedicated to making photography more accessible. We try not to burden you with information about topics you do not need right now. It is well proven that truly active learning only occurs when you receive the information you need, at the time you need it, in the amounts you need. We aim to only provide you with the hints and tips that are relevant to your current level.


Jargon lite

We know how confusing photography and technical jargon is for the average camera and software user. We make learning more natural for you by using simple language and breaking everything down into bite-sized chunks. We regularly repeat critical concepts so that you can take it all in, a little bit, by a little bit.


All of our group courses notes reflect this philosophy and are specially written in plain English. They are also illustrated with full-color photographs and illustrations to show you precisely what you need to know. These notes have been fine-tuned in a classroom setting to ensure each of the tips in them works well out in the real world.


Which is the best camera phone? It depends!

We also avoid making statements about what camera phone is ‘best.’ The truth is that there is no such thing! The answer to ANY question in creativity goes like this “It depends”; it depends on what you are shooting, it depends on the light, it depends on being able to control the ISO.” And on, and on, and on.


You probably do not need new gear

We do not think you need new equipment. Your camera phone can still take the same pictures today that it could when you bought it. We plan to teach you how to use it much better.


Our promise

  • To remain brand neutral. We will never fool you into thinking a particular brand is ‘great’ because we am paid to say so. All brands are great, and we never take money from any of them.

  • To only ever mention equipment or software that we use or that we think our students would benefit from

  • To always try to translate photography terminology in a way that it relates to you and your camera.

  • To never cram different levels into my courses, if a class has ‘Beginner’ in the title, it is indeed a beginners course.

  • To keep it fun!